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Samsung's graphene batteries could charge your phone in 12 minutes

Samsung's graphene batteries could charge your phone in 12 minutes

Samsung could have your phone battery charged within minutes with their new graphene batteries.

The technology company have been working on using graphene balls for the batteries in their smartphones and other handheld devices to help you get back connected quicker.

Sharing their findings in the Nature Communications journal, they wrote: "Improving one property without sacrificing others is challenging for lithium-ion batteries due to the trade-off nature among key parameters. Here we report a chemical vapor deposition process to grow a graphene-silica assembly, called a graphene ball.

"Its hierarchical three-dimensional structure with the silicon oxide nanoparticle center allows even 1 wt% graphene ball to be uniformly coated onto a nickel-rich layered cathode via scalable Nobilta milling.

"The graphene-ball coating improves cycle life and fast charging capability by suppressing detrimental side reactions and providing efficient conductive pathways. The graphene ball itself also serves as an anode material with a high specific capacity of 716.2 mAh g−1.

"A full-cell incorporating graphene balls increases the volumetric energy density by 27.6% compared to a control cell without graphene balls, showing the possibility of achieving 800 Wh L−1 in a commercial cell setting, along with a high cyclability of 78.6% capacity retention after 500 cycles at 5C and 60 °C."

Samsung's Advanced Institute of Technology have been working alongside Sungkyunkwan University's School of Advanced Materials Sciences and Engineering on the new battery design.

Whang Dong-mok, professor at Sungkyunhwan University, said: "The latest achievement is significant in that it has expanded the range of two-dimensional materials. It will be possible to discover new areas of application by utilizing the new characteristics of the amorphous material."

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